Old and New Gear

Anyone who browses my website will probably stumble across "Silver Halide Projects," a page dedicated to some of my film photography.  Even though most of my work is digital, I'm still passionate about film photography.  It separates me from the computer –  at least until the final scanning – and creates something physical: the negative.  Film photography forces the photographer to slow down, and truly compose the photo mentally.

 Fuji Pro 400H; Pentax 645

Fuji Pro 400H; Pentax 645

To me, film has a different look, and a different mood than digital.  When photographing somewhere with dim light, the resulting grain in film can give an impressionistic feel to a black and white shot, whereas digital grain can simply look unpleasant.  Likewise, great colour films that Fuji and Kodak make have lovely palettes of colours hard to imitate in digital post-processing.

 Ilford Delta Pro 3200; Pentax K1000

Ilford Delta Pro 3200; Pentax K1000

To pursue this passion further, I've upgraded my film scanner to an Epson V550, and added a Pentax 645 to my camera collection.  The 645 uses large film.  The image it creates inside the camera is larger than the sensors of the average professional camera, and comparable to the sensors in cameras that cost as much as luxury cars.  This means higher resolution, and the ability to produce photos that really pop with a 3-D feel.

 Ilford 400, pushed two stops; Pentax 645

Ilford 400, pushed two stops; Pentax 645

Here's to film – still beautiful, and still relevant.

Autumn Colours

Autumn is a great time for photography; I've always loved capturing the changing landscape.  Even on a grey day, the soft lighting saturates the colours, making them all the more vibrant.  I was fortunate enough to get out to Dundas Valley and the Royal Botanical gardens last week.  One of my first passions in photography was landscape.  It was great to revisit it and create some photos that captured the transition of the seasons

CIBC Run for the Cure

Last Sunday I took part in the CIBC Run for the Cure in Toronto.  Despite a bit of rain, it was a great event for an important cause.

I wanted to capture a bit of the event, and decided to make a little challenge of it for myself. I took a 1950s era viewfinder camera, a Voigtländer Vito B.  Without a light meter or rangefinder, setting the exposure and focus is done by estimation.  Thankfully, it all worked out.